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Monday, August 15, 2016

For the Professors, Part 6: Five Exercises in Small Failure

by Steven S. Vrooman

I came to East Tennessee State University for two purposes. 

The first was to guide the communication studies instructors through faculty development on three issues: 1) failure, 2) feedback, and 3) revision. These are three things I think we need to do more of in speaking classrooms. In addition to showing why these things work and are needed, I gave them a pile of speaking exercises and ideas so that they could take the things that would work for their approaches to their courses. 

The second is to lead the non-communication faculty in a workshop on how to incorporate speaking into their courses in ways that work for their other instructional goals and don't take away too much time from the other content of the course. They have likely heard pitches like this before. My test, when I give the presentation tomorrow, will be to deliver them what I promised, which is to give them some new and creative things they haven't heard before.

When I finish this trip (or, depending on how long I end up laid over at the Atlanta airport), I will begin a series of blog posts which take my readers through those ideas. I'd still like to come to your university and present it myself (hint, hint), but these are ideas worth sharing, so I will.

I will also be updating this particular blog post with the first set of activities from the "failure" portion of the first presentation. But, until then, I promised the ETSU faculty that I'd put links to some of the online resources they wanted from my presentation here now. So I will, and I'll explain to everyone else what to do with them a bit later.


The Elocutionary Exercises:

Here are the links to the century-old images if you want to build this activity yourself.

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/012499534

https://archive.org/details/practicalillustr00engluoft


But I've already done that and you can grab the link to the PowerPoint here.

The educational statistics site:


https://nces.ed.gov/


The Ripper site:


http://casebook.org/suspects/

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